Eve T1 Review: Windows Tablet for Just $175

by Reads (11,251)
Editor's Rating

Ratings Breakdown (1-10)

    • Usability
    • 6
    • Design
    • 6
    • Performance
    • 7
    • Features
    • 5
    • Price/Value Rating
    • 10
    • Total Score:
    • 6.80
    • Rating 1 to 10, top score 10

Overview

  • Pros

    • Extremely low price
    • Solid core specs
    • Good performance
  • Cons

    • No HDMI video-out
    • No USB Host
    • Limited advantages over Android competitors

Quick Take

A basic but very effective Windows 8.1 tablet for a very reasonable price. If that's what you're interested in, the Eve T1 is a device to take a serious look at.

Traditionally, sub-$200 tablets have been the domain of Google’s Android operating system, which can get away with cutting a lot more corners than the more demanding desktop-born Windows 8.1. But with prices on everything dropping, we’ve started to see devices like the new Eve T1: a full-fledged Windows tablet with a 1.8 GHz quad-core processor, 2 GB of RAM, and 32 GB of storage, all priced at 159 Euros, or roughly $175 at current exchange rates. Better yet, free basic shipping is included … no small ticket item considering that the Eve hails from Finland.

Traditionally, sub-$200 tablets have been the domain of Google’s Android, which can get away with cutting a lot more corners than the more demanding desktop-born Windows 8.1. But with prices on everything dropping, we’ve started to see devices like the new Eve T1: a full-fledged Windows tablet with a 1.8 GHz quad-core processor, 2 GB of RAM, and 32 GB of storage, all priced at 159 Euros, or roughly $175 at current exchange rates. Better yet, free basic shipping is included … no small ticket item considering that the Eve hails from Finland.

Build and Design

Eve T1 - Landscape Mode

Eve T1 – Landscape Mode

Cracking open the packaging, the T1 looks a lot like any other basic flat black tablet, though it most closely resembles some of Asus’ models. A flat, understated front is matched by a curved and lightly textured rear. The only real marking on the front is the Windows key, although the sides also feature a microSD card slot and basic buttons.

The device feels solid though, at least as well designed as any comparable Android model, despite having somewhat more demanding hardware requirements to support Windows 8. It certainly doesn’t feel under-built or flimsy in any way, quite the opposite. There seems no reason for reservations about the design.

Screen

At 1280 x 800, the display isn’t going to wow you if you’re accustomed to the super high resolutions on more expensive devices. But it’s serviceable, with both the colors and clarity turning out quite solid. With that resolution stretched across a relatively compact 8 inches, you’re not going to feel the lower pixel density as much as you would on a 10-inch screen.

Eve T1 - Side View

Eve T1 – Side View

The screen itself is protected by a layer of hardened glass, albeit not the Gorilla Glass found in many more expensive gadgets.

Buttons and Ports

With such solid hardware, this would be a great device to be able to hook up to some peripherals, possibly even replacing a low-end desktop computer for some people. It could certainly serve as a dockable second PC for a student. Unfortunately, connecting to accessories is limited. Neither USB Host nor HDMI made the cut, so the two best ways are out. There’s always Bluetooth for keyboard and mouse, Wi-Fi for network attached storage, however.

And the T1 does support Miracast, so there are options for connecting to an external display. But Miracast is still inferior to HDMI for most things, including anything high motion, just as Bluetooth isn’t as fast or universal as USB.

That said, the T1 makes no bones about being an inexpensive device focused on core specs. There’s very few bells and whistles, so it’s not like HDMI and USB Host stand out for being omitted. It just would have been nice to have, and possibly made a case for the T1 in a particular market.



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  1. thedawn

    You explicitly mention the lack of USB Host. Meanwhile, according to their facebook page, Eve is designing OTG and microUSB cables… It doesn’t really make sense if the feature isn’t supported on the hardware level by the tablet. Could you please clarify?